FROM DISRUPTION TO SUSTAINABLE GROWTH

Vision. Strategy. Innovation. Growth
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We need to find innovative solutions to the great problems of today to make them the opportunities of the future.

Ci2015 will feature over 40 global leaders, innovators and thinkers and deliver world class creative ideas and pragmatic solutions. It will offer credible forecasts, strategies and practices to help transform you and the leadership of organisations.

Join big and small business, educators, entrepreneurs, creative and government leaders, emerging talent and leading thinkers from around the World.

This is a must-­attend event for everyone seeking fresh insights, ideas, tools and connections.

23 – 25 MARCH, 2015
Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, Australia

Ci2015 SPEAKERS

Dr Peter Diamandis (USA)
Chairman and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation; recently named one of "The World's 50 Greatest Leaders" by Fortune Magazine
Dr Peter Diamandis (USA)
Nolan Bushnell (USA)
Founder, Atari; co-creator of GPS and touch-screen technology
Nolan Bushnell (USA)
Dan Millmann (USA)
Author: "Way of the Peaceful Warrior" and expert on mindfulness
Dan Millmann (USA)
Scott Anthony (Singapore)
Managing Partner Innosight; Strategy and disruptive innovation expert; Harvard Business Author
Scott Anthony (Singapore)
Dr Ernesto Sirolli (USA)
Founder of the Sirolli Institute, the global authority on bottom up economic development
Ernesto Sirolli (USA)
Joyce Phillips
Group Managing Director of ANZ Global Wealth
Joyce Phillips
Dr Tim Flannery
One of Australia's best-known scientists and environmentalists and best-selling author
Dr Tim Flannery
Matt Barrie
CEO and Chairman of Freelancer.com, a global online outsourcing marketplace; award-winning Australian technology entrepreneur
Matt Barrie
Steve Vamos
Director Telstra; Chairman Reading Room; technology and leadership expert
Steve Vamos
Professor Linda Kristjanson
Vice-Chancellor and President of Swinburne University
Professor Linda Kristjanson
Dr Larry Marshall (USA)
Managing Director of Southern Cross Ventures, a venture capital firm based in Silicon Valley, Shanghai and Sydney, specializing in growing Australia technology companies in Asia & USA
Dr Larry Marshall

Ci2015 VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

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  • Money for Nothing

    The New Republic
    Atossa Abrahamian

    Some years ago, I had a colleague who would frequently complain that he didn’t have enough to do. He’d mention how much free time he had to our team, ask for more tasks from our boss, and bring it up at after-work drinks. He was right, of course, about the situation: Although we were hardly idle, even the most productive among us couldn’t claim to be toiling for eight (or even five, sometimes three) full hours a day. My colleague, who’d come out of a difficult bout of unemployment, simply could not believe that this justified his salary. It took him a long time to start playing along: checking Twitter, posting on Facebook, reading the paper, and texting friends while fulfilling his professional obligations to the fullest of his abilities.

    The idea of being paid to do nothing is difficult to adjust to in a society that places a high value on work. Yet this idea has lately gained serious attention amid projections that the progress of globalization and technology will lead to a “jobless” future

    Read the full article

  • Consumers fear tech will fuel loneliness even as they embrace it

    CNET
    Connie Guglielmo

    It’s hard to know what the future will bring, but a majority of US consumers think that five decades from now, we’ll all be overly dependent on tech and spend less time interacting with each other.

    At the same time, consumers believe tech makes our lives easier and are most enthusiastic about where things are headed with computers, smartphones and smart home gear.

    Those are the top takeaways from a study by Intel that in May asked 1,000 adult consumers in the US — including 102 described as “tech elites” — what they’re excited and concerned about when it comes to technology over the next 50 years.

    Read the full article

  • Curiosity and What Equality Really Means

    The New Yorker
    Atul Gawande

    I want to start with a story. One night, on my surgery rotation, during my third year of medical school, I followed my chief resident into the trauma bay in the emergency department. We’d been summoned to see a prisoner who’d swallowed half a razor blade and slashed his left wrist with the corner of the crimp on a toothpaste tube. He was about thirty, built like a boxer, with a tattooed neck, hands shackled to the gurney, and gauze around his left wrist showing bright crimson seeping through.

    The first thing out of his mouth was a creepy comment about the chief resident, an Asian-American woman. I won’t say what he said. Just know he managed in only a few words to be racist, sexist, and utterly menacing to her. She turned on her heels, handed me the clipboard, and said, “He’s all yours.”

    I looked at the two policemen with him to see what they were going to do. I don’t know what I expected. That they’d yell at him? Beat him? But they only looked at me impassively, maybe slightly amused. He was all mine.

    So what now?

    Read the full article

  • In a world of digital nomads, we will all be made homeless

    The Guardian
    John Harris

    Whose utopia is this, when people have to sever emotional links and leave where they grew up to find dependable work?

    The office-space empire WeWork was founded eight years ago in New York. It currently leases 240,000 sq metres of real estate in London alone, which reportedly makes it the city’s largest user of offices after the British government. The basic deal is simple enough: you can either pay to put your laptop wherever there is space, or stump up a little more for a more dependable desk or entire office – and, in either case, take advantage of the fact that, with operations in 20 countries, WeWork offers the chance to traverse the planet and temporarily set up shop in no end of locations.

    Part of the WeWork idea, moreover, is that a place to toil is only part of what is on offer. As well as your workspace, there will be free beer on tap, regular yoga and pilates sessions, and more. As the working day winds on and such distractions – along with the necessity of meeting other footloose hotshots, and comparing “projects” – take up more of your time, a couple of questions might spring to mind: what is work, and what is leisure? And does the distinction even count for much any more?

    Read the full article

  • AI, automation, and the future of work: Ten things to solve for

    Mckinsey Global Institute
    James Manyika and Kevin Sneader

    Automation and artificial intelligence (AI) are transforming businesses and will contribute to economic growth via contributions to productivity. They will also help address “moonshot” societal challenges in areas from health to climate change.

    At the same time, these technologies will transform the nature of work and the workplace itself. Machines will be able to carry out more of the tasks done by humans, complement the work that humans do, and even perform some tasks that go beyond what humans can do. As a result, some occupations will decline, others will grow, and many more will change. While we believe there will be enough work to go around (barring extreme scenarios), society will need to grapple with significant workforce transitions and dislocation. Workers will need to acquire new skills and adapt to the increasingly capable machines alongside them in the workplace. They may have to move from declining occupations to growing and, in some cases, new occupations.

    Read the full article

     

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