Thought Pieces

Three ways to react to the rise of the machines

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

Keith McNulty

“The system goes on-line August 4th, 1997. Human decisions are removed from strategic defense. Skynet begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware at 2:14 a.m. Eastern time, August 29th. In a panic, they try to pull the plug.”

Fans of sci-fi may recognize this quote from Terminator 2: Judgment Day. As a child, the scenario it portrayed utterly terrified me. It’s not the first movie that featured machines becoming self-aware. Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is famous for the calm, monotonic but spine-chilling utterance from HAL 9000: “I’m sorry Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that”.

Read the full article

Post a Comment »

Next Stop, Uberland: The Onrushing Algorithmic Future of Work

Monday, 19 November 2018

Intelligencer – New York Magazine
Adrian Chen

As much as we all hate bosses, you have to admit they have gotten slightly better over the years. Frederick Winslow Taylor, the odd and efficiency-obsessed father of management theory, was fond of dispatching managers to stand over workers with stopwatches and direct their every movement as if they were trained animals. Reacting to the obviously soul-crushing nature of Taylorism, a wave of touch-feely business gurus in the 1960s aimed to inspire people into becoming more productive. This has led, over the course of the last few decades, to the insipid corporate culture of team-building exercises and black-bordered posters of windsurfers at sunset, but at least there’s free coffee now.

Read the full article

Post a Comment »

Work in the Age of Intelligent Machines

Monday, 12 November 2018

The Financial Times UK
Martin Wolf

How do you organise a society in which few people do anything economically productive?

As long ago as 1984, in his Paths to Paradise, André Gorz, a self-proclaimed “revolutionary-reformist” stated, baldly, that the “micro-economic revolution heralds the abolition of work”. He even argued that “waged work . . . may cease to be a central preoccupation by the end of the century”. His timing was wrong. But serious analysts think he was directionally right. So what might a world of intelligent machines mean for humanity? Will human beings become as economically irrelevant as horses? If so, what will happen to our individual self-worth and the organisation of our societies?

Read the full article

Post a Comment »

The future of work won’t be about college degrees, it will be about job skills

Thursday, 8 November 2018

CNBC
Stephane Kasriel

Twenty million students started college this fall, and this much is certain: The vast majority of them will be taking on debt — a lot of debt. What’s less certain is whether their degrees will pay off.

According to the survey Freelancing in America 2018, released Wednesday, freelancers put more value on skills training: 93 percent of freelancers with a four-year college degree say skills training was useful versus only 79 percent who say their college education was useful to the work they do now. In addition, 70 percent of full-time freelancers participated in skills training in the past six months compared to only 49 percent of full-time non-freelancers. The fifth annual survey, conducted by research firm Edelman Intelligence and co-commissioned by Upwork and Freelancers Union, polled 6,001 U.S. workers.

Read the full article 

Post a Comment »

Money for Nothing

Monday, 3 September 2018

The New Republic
Atossa Abrahamian

Some years ago, I had a colleague who would frequently complain that he didn’t have enough to do. He’d mention how much free time he had to our team, ask for more tasks from our boss, and bring it up at after-work drinks. He was right, of course, about the situation: Although we were hardly idle, even the most productive among us couldn’t claim to be toiling for eight (or even five, sometimes three) full hours a day. My colleague, who’d come out of a difficult bout of unemployment, simply could not believe that this justified his salary. It took him a long time to start playing along: checking Twitter, posting on Facebook, reading the paper, and texting friends while fulfilling his professional obligations to the fullest of his abilities.

The idea of being paid to do nothing is difficult to adjust to in a society that places a high value on work. Yet this idea has lately gained serious attention amid projections that the progress of globalization and technology will lead to a “jobless” future

Read the full article

Post a Comment »

Consumers fear tech will fuel loneliness even as they embrace it

Monday, 3 September 2018

CNET
Connie Guglielmo

It’s hard to know what the future will bring, but a majority of US consumers think that five decades from now, we’ll all be overly dependent on tech and spend less time interacting with each other.

At the same time, consumers believe tech makes our lives easier and are most enthusiastic about where things are headed with computers, smartphones and smart home gear.

Those are the top takeaways from a study by Intel that in May asked 1,000 adult consumers in the US — including 102 described as “tech elites” — what they’re excited and concerned about when it comes to technology over the next 50 years.

Read the full article

Post a Comment »

"Best Conference EVER" - Micenet Australia Magazine