The Exponential Shift

Making Transformation Happen
We need to find innovative solutions to the great problems of today to make them the opportunities of the future.

Ci2016 will feature 40+ global leaders, innovators, thinkers and deliver world class ideas and pragmatic solutions. It will offer forecasts, strategies and practices to help transform you and your organisations.

Join big and small business, educators, entrepreneurs, creative and government leaders, emerging talent and leading thinkers from around the world.

The must-­attend event for everyone seeking fresh insights, ideas, tools and connections.

7–9 NOVEMBER, 2016
Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, Australia

Proudly supported by

Proudly supported by Creative Universe

Ci2016 SPEAKERS

Prof Hiroshi Ishiguro (Japan)

Director of the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Osaka University; Winner best humanoid award four times in RoboCup; Named one of the top 100 geniuses alive in the world today

Professor Hiroshi Ishiguro (Japan)
Dr Abigail Allwood (USA)

Astrobiologist, Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA; first female principal investigator on a Mars mission

Dr Abigail Allwood (USA)
Dr Daniel Kraft (USA)

Physician-scientist, inventor and innovator; Founder & Executive Director, Exponential Medicine; Medicine Track Faculty Chair, Singularity University; TED speaker

Dr Daniel Kraft (USA)
Martin Ford (USA)

Leading expert on the robot revolution, artificial intelligence, job automation and the impact of accelerating technology on the economy and society; Author: Rise of the Robots

Martin Ford (USA)
Professor Tanya Monro

South Australian Scientist of the Year, Telstra Business Women of the Year, Prime Minister’s Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year

Professor Tanya_Monro
Ramez Naam (USA)

Computer scientist, futurist, award-winning author; Energy & Environmental Systems faculty member, Singularity University

Ramez Naam (USA)
Scott Anthony (Singapore)

Strategic transformation and disruptive innovation expert. Partner of Innosight and author of The Innovator’s Guide to Growth and The Little Black Book of Innovation

Scott Anthony (Singapore)
Stephen Heppell (UK)

Professor at Bournemouth University and Universidad Camilo José Cela, Madrid; One of the most influential academics in the field of technology and education globally

Stephen Heppell (UK)
Professor Michelle Simmons

Scientia Professor of Physics, University of New South Wales; Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow; NSW Scientist of the Year

Professor Michelle Simmons
David Gonski AC

Chairman of the Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd and Coca-Cola Amatil Limited

David Gonski AC
Dr Alan Finkel AO

Dr Finkel commenced as Australia’s Chief Scientist on 25 January 2016. He is Australia’s eighth Chief Scientist

Dr Alan Finkel AO
 
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  • These Are the Most Exciting Industries and Jobs of the Future

    We’ve all read the headlines: the robots are coming, and they will take our jobs. In fact, up to 45 percent of tasks workers perform can be automated using current technology, let alone future forecasts. (Read more…)

  • Delivering Through Diversity

    Our latest research reinforces the link between diversity and company financial performance—and suggests how organizations can craft better inclusion strategies for a competitive edge.

    (Read more…)

  • Oxfam’s annual inequality report

    It’s the first day of the World Economic Forum, in Davos, which means that Oxfam is releasing its annual shame-the-rich report. I’ve been rudeabout this report in the past, because I don’t believe that statistics of the form “the top X has as much wealth as the bottom Y” are particularly enlightening or helpful. After all, according to the standard methodology, my niece, who just got her first 50 cents in pocket money, has more money than the poorest 2 billion people in the world combined.

    (Read more…)

  • How Fast Is AI Progressing? Stanford’s New Report Card for Artificial Intelligence

    When? This is probably the question that futurists, AI experts, and even people with a keen interest in technology dread the most. It has proved famously difficult to predict when new developments in AI will take place. The scientists at the Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence in 1956 thought that perhaps two months would be enough to make “significant advances” in a whole range of complex problems, including computers that can understand language, improve themselves, and even understand abstract concepts. (Read more…)

  • Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs

    Work has ruled our lives for centuries, and it does so today more than ever. But a new generation of thinkers insists there is an alternative.
    (Read more…)

Ci2016 VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

CiTV
Watch videos from our past conferences at CiTV Australian Event Awards - Vote now! 2014 Eventex Awards winner - Read the press release (PDF) Ci2015 profile on SMART 100- Read the article Register Now!