The Exponential Shift

Making Transformation Happen
We need to find innovative solutions to the great problems of today to make them the opportunities of the future.

Ci2016 will feature 40+ global leaders, innovators, thinkers and deliver world class ideas and pragmatic solutions. It will offer forecasts, strategies and practices to help transform you and your organisations.

Join big and small business, educators, entrepreneurs, creative and government leaders, emerging talent and leading thinkers from around the world.

The must-­attend event for everyone seeking fresh insights, ideas, tools and connections.

7–9 NOVEMBER, 2016
Sofitel Melbourne on Collins, Australia

Proudly supported by

Proudly supported by Creative Universe

Ci2016 SPEAKERS

Prof Hiroshi Ishiguro (Japan)

Director of the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory, Osaka University; Winner best humanoid award four times in RoboCup; Named one of the top 100 geniuses alive in the world today

Professor Hiroshi Ishiguro (Japan)
Dr Abigail Allwood (USA)

Astrobiologist, Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA; first female principal investigator on a Mars mission

Dr Abigail Allwood (USA)
Dr Daniel Kraft (USA)

Physician-scientist, inventor and innovator; Founder & Executive Director, Exponential Medicine; Medicine Track Faculty Chair, Singularity University; TED speaker

Dr Daniel Kraft (USA)
Martin Ford (USA)

Leading expert on the robot revolution, artificial intelligence, job automation and the impact of accelerating technology on the economy and society; Author: Rise of the Robots

Martin Ford (USA)
Professor Tanya Monro

South Australian Scientist of the Year, Telstra Business Women of the Year, Prime Minister’s Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year

Professor Tanya_Monro
Ramez Naam (USA)

Computer scientist, futurist, award-winning author; Energy & Environmental Systems faculty member, Singularity University

Ramez Naam (USA)
Scott Anthony (Singapore)

Strategic transformation and disruptive innovation expert. Partner of Innosight and author of The Innovator’s Guide to Growth and The Little Black Book of Innovation

Scott Anthony (Singapore)
Stephen Heppell (UK)

Professor at Bournemouth University and Universidad Camilo José Cela, Madrid; One of the most influential academics in the field of technology and education globally

Stephen Heppell (UK)
Professor Michelle Simmons

Scientia Professor of Physics, University of New South Wales; Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow; NSW Scientist of the Year

Professor Michelle Simmons
David Gonski AC

Chairman of the Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd and Coca-Cola Amatil Limited

David Gonski AC
Dr Alan Finkel AO

Dr Finkel commenced as Australia’s Chief Scientist on 25 January 2016. He is Australia’s eighth Chief Scientist

Dr Alan Finkel AO
 
Follow us on Twitter
Subscribe via RSS
  • Curiosity and What Equality Really Means

    The New Yorker
    Atul Gawande

    I want to start with a story. One night, on my surgery rotation, during my third year of medical school, I followed my chief resident into the trauma bay in the emergency department. We’d been summoned to see a prisoner who’d swallowed half a razor blade and slashed his left wrist with the corner of the crimp on a toothpaste tube. He was about thirty, built like a boxer, with a tattooed neck, hands shackled to the gurney, and gauze around his left wrist showing bright crimson seeping through.

    The first thing out of his mouth was a creepy comment about the chief resident, an Asian-American woman. I won’t say what he said. Just know he managed in only a few words to be racist, sexist, and utterly menacing to her. She turned on her heels, handed me the clipboard, and said, “He’s all yours.”

    I looked at the two policemen with him to see what they were going to do. I don’t know what I expected. That they’d yell at him? Beat him? But they only looked at me impassively, maybe slightly amused. He was all mine.

    So what now?

    Read the full article

  • In a world of digital nomads, we will all be made homeless

    The Guardian
    John Harris

    Whose utopia is this, when people have to sever emotional links and leave where they grew up to find dependable work?

    The office-space empire WeWork was founded eight years ago in New York. It currently leases 240,000 sq metres of real estate in London alone, which reportedly makes it the city’s largest user of offices after the British government. The basic deal is simple enough: you can either pay to put your laptop wherever there is space, or stump up a little more for a more dependable desk or entire office – and, in either case, take advantage of the fact that, with operations in 20 countries, WeWork offers the chance to traverse the planet and temporarily set up shop in no end of locations.

    Part of the WeWork idea, moreover, is that a place to toil is only part of what is on offer. As well as your workspace, there will be free beer on tap, regular yoga and pilates sessions, and more. As the working day winds on and such distractions – along with the necessity of meeting other footloose hotshots, and comparing “projects” – take up more of your time, a couple of questions might spring to mind: what is work, and what is leisure? And does the distinction even count for much any more?

    Read the full article

  • AI, automation, and the future of work: Ten things to solve for

    Mckinsey Global Institute
    James Manyika and Kevin Sneader

    Automation and artificial intelligence (AI) are transforming businesses and will contribute to economic growth via contributions to productivity. They will also help address “moonshot” societal challenges in areas from health to climate change.

    At the same time, these technologies will transform the nature of work and the workplace itself. Machines will be able to carry out more of the tasks done by humans, complement the work that humans do, and even perform some tasks that go beyond what humans can do. As a result, some occupations will decline, others will grow, and many more will change. While we believe there will be enough work to go around (barring extreme scenarios), society will need to grapple with significant workforce transitions and dislocation. Workers will need to acquire new skills and adapt to the increasingly capable machines alongside them in the workplace. They may have to move from declining occupations to growing and, in some cases, new occupations.

    Read the full article

     

  • Skill shift: Automation and the future of the workforce

    McKinsey Global Institute 
    Jacques Bughin, Eric Hazan, Susan Lund, Peter Dahlström, Anna Wiesinger, and Amresh Subramaniam

    Skill shifts have accompanied the introduction of new technologies in the workplace since at least the Industrial Revolution, but adoption of automation and artificial intelligence (AI) will mark an acceleration over the shifts of even the recent past. The need for some skills, such as technological as well as social and emotional skills, will rise, even as the demand for others, including physical and manual skills, will fall. These changes will require workers everywhere to deepen their existing skill sets or acquire new ones. Companies, too, will need to rethink how work is organized within their organizations.

    This briefing, part of our ongoing research on the impact of technology on the economy, business, and society, quantifies time spent on 25 core workplace skills today and in the future for five European countries—France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom—and the United States and examines the implications of those shifts.

    Read the full article

  • Capitalism in the age of robots: work, income and wealth in the 21st century

    Johns Hopkins University
    Adair Turner

    My title is “Capitalism in the age of robots” and my aim is to consider the possible long-term impact of rapid technological progress – and in particular of work automation and artificial intelligence. And I will sometimes use the word “robots” as shorthand for any sort of machine – any combination of hardware and software – that can perform any sort of work, rather than specifically meaning something which looks like a human, with legs, arms and a smiley face.

    I will argue that the rapid, unstoppable, and limitless progress of automation potential will have profound implications for the nature of and need for work, and for the distribution of income and wealth. But also profound implications for the very meaning of some concepts and measures which play a fundamental role in economic analysis – in particular productivity growth and GDP per capita. At the limit indeed, one can question whether the very concept of “an economy” or of “economics” – if defined as the study of production and consumption choices amid conditions of inherent scarcity – have any meaning in a world where, eventually, all human work activities can be automated.

    Read the full article

     

Ci2016 VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

CiTV
Watch videos from our past conferences at CiTV Australian Event Awards - Vote now! 2014 Eventex Awards winner - Read the press release (PDF) Ci2015 profile on SMART 100- Read the article Register Now!